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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 93 (some duplicates have been removed)
to do this by e elect trail means. they had to win an election. they weren't confidence about that. there was an incredible a. para military violence that went in to. and the results very uneven. thag how they went out of the union. what proceeded that? when you're in a meeting and everything unanimous. don't you get suspicious? i do. there was a lot of back story to how thigh pulled it off. other places the back story showed. in alabama the up country representative just charged they were being run out of the union with that democracy was being completely violated. people in virginia looked tat and said no ordinary farmer has voted for this. they have run us out of the union without the consideration of democratic process. i think it's interesting it's revealing what democracy was and innocent a slave regime in 1860. they called it a democracy. they sometimes often made the case what they wanted was a republican and democracy was mob of course sei. it was part of the reason they wanted out of the union. they didn't like the direction it was going. they had to play the game to get
in politics, san antonio mayor julian castro and his air dentical twin, joaquin castro, just elected to congress. that's a big group but there's a lot to talk about on "face the nation." captioning sponsored by cbs from cbs news in washington, "face the nation" with bob schieffer. >> and good morning again. we welcome to the broadcast david plouffe architect of the president's election in 2008, again last year a key adviser in the administration throughout. let me ask you first about the situation in algeria where this awful terrorist attack took place. we know that there were seven americans at that compound, and the reports are one is dead. do you have any more information on any of the others? >> i don't this morning bob. obviously, if and when we have additional information, the state department will release that >> and what about this whole state of terrorism now? have we defeated al qaeda, as some in the administration were talking about earlier? >> well, we have i think decimated a lot of al qaeda's top leadership particularly in the afghanistan-pakistan region. but i think wh
elected officials. i won. i won. i am far less naive today than i was four years ago but far more certain today who i am and where i want to take this country over the next four years. basically, that's what that peach was. >> what's the practical fact, he talked about climate change. he won't pass cap and trade through the house. >> when i heard that line, what struck me is this is the obama-care of the second ad administration. climate change is the sleeping dog issue that he is going to be what he will fashion piecemeal. i think that will be part of the second term legacy what he gets done. not so much the social stuff a lot of people certainly in the conservative movement concern themselves with, the bigger idea that falls into that broader vision. he reformed one six of the nation's economy with health care. now, he will go to the next level with global change on the environment. i see that as a sleeper and agree it was a very progressive speech. the idea he's putting a period on the reagan period saying this is a new day, we're going a new way and these are the agenda items i will t
can still win elections without them. >> well, david, five states where gop lawmakers have introduced billed making it illegal to enforce president obama's new executive action and gun proposals, another example of states' rights and nullifications. the states of tennessee, wyoming, south carolina and north dakota. so here we are with a states' rights movement live and well in 2013. this is unreal. >> well, i don't think these guys truly understand the constitution. under the constitution, which they claimed to cherish, you know, it's not yahoo sheriffs who get to decide whether something is constitutional or not. it's something called the supreme court. so right away, they're undermining our entire system by issuing their edicts or their fiats against these actions. but i'm still waiting. i'm waiting for any of these guys to come out and say okay, 23 executive actions? which ones don't you like? the ones that make it easier for universal background checks to be -- to happen as they should be happening, just on the basis of regulations and guidances? what law -- which executive action
to washington, you already paid for it. well, this is the day they all voted for. and this country elected this president, elections matter, everyone who went to the polling place went to the trouble of getting involved in this campaign. it's getting the reality of it to come true today. i am curious, i know the president is committed to do something about public safety. we can see that in his heart since newtown. we know he wants to do something on immigration because the there to be fixed and both parties want to deal with it fur all kinds of reasons. i'm waiting to see if there's a halfton in his speech today, something about rebuilding this country. i think this president's instincts are good on war and peace. i hope they are good about building this country. i wish the labor unions and all kinds of people would get out to say, let's do what we did when eisenhower was president, a moderate republican. build this country up, rebuild our highways, our bridges, our big cities and transit systems, inner city transportation, really build up this country with jobs. all this talk about debt,
before women got the right to vote. and now we just had a historic election where there are more women in congress than we have ever had before. it's really an incredible movement, and i work at emily's list, and emily's list has been working on it for 28 years to get more women on the pipeline. and we are picking it up. >> sam, it seems to me that the president was almost like an ich bin ein berliner speech. he's a man of color himself. but to embrace all of this together, i have never heard any of it -- none of this they. there was no they. it was all we, a lot of we. >> keep in mind, i thought the theme was that change can spark from the individual. in all these cases you have change being a grassroots entity, but it has to have a component of the state and government to help foster it, and the line that really stuck out to me was these truths can be self-evident, but they're not self-executing. what he made was a case for why there is an important role for the government to play to basically protect our rights but also to advance us as a society whether it's on climate change, immi
election. 61% say he's easy-going and likable. 55% say he can handle a crisis. 51% say he's a good commander in chief. while only 29% say that he works effectively with congress. we'll be right back. the beaches and waters couldn't be more beautiful. take a boat ride or just lay in the sun. enjoy the wildlife and natural beauty. and don't forget our amazing seafood. so come to the gulf, you'll have a great time. especially in alabama. you mean mississippi. that's florida. say louisiana or there's no dessert. brought to you by bp and all of us who call the gulf home. >>> welcome back to "hardball." one of president obama's first major challenges in his second term will be trying to get significant new gun control legislation through the congress, but can he do it? if the outrageous opposition coming from the right is any indication, the president has a major fight on his hands. the nra has labeled him an elitist hypocrite and called out his daughters who receive secret service protection. yesterday senator ted cruz accused the president of exploiting the murder of children to push t
as president. that's a hair above the 51% that put him back in office in the november election. 61% say he's easy-going and likable. 55% say he can handle a crisis. 51% say he's a good commander in chief. while only 29% say that he works effectively with congress. we'll be right back. elp protecth as you age... would you take it? well, there is. [ male announcer ] it's called ocuvite. a vitamin totally dedicated to your eyes, from the eye care experts at bausch + lomb. as you age, eyes can lose vital nutrients. ocuvite helps replenish key eye nutrients. ocuvite has a unique formula not found in your multivitamin to help protect your eye health. now that's a pill worth taking. [ male announcer ] ocuvite. help protect your eye health. yeah. then how'd i get this... [ voice of dennis ] ...safe driving bonus check? every six months without an accident, allstate sends a check. ok. [ voice of dennis ] silence. are you in good hands? >>> welcome back to "hardball." one of president obama's first major challenges in his second term will be trying to get significant new gun control legislation thro
in washington. let at the start with this. it used to be the only way to get elected in the south was to be the farthest out there in backing segregation. anyone who showed moderation was seen as soft. anyone who talked compromise on civil rights was suspected of being on the other side. well, to win in today's republican party, which began displacing the dixiekrats a half century ago, you have to be the farthest out there backing guns. show moderation you get your nra badge ripped off you. agree to any rule on gun safety and you're marked as a traitor for life. today some of the top people in the republican party, the people to watch, marco rubio, rand paul, ted cruz are right out there front in opposing president obama on gun safety. so what happened? why is the gop, the party of guns over people? our guests are congresswoman carolyn mccarthy, a democrat of new york, and cynthia tucker, a pulitzer prize winning columnist. thank you both for joining us. you have been in this fight for so long, congresswoman mccarthy. i have to ask you, is there something out there in the water th
, working to desegregate the deep south. >> the fact that obama could be elected again shows that the stone of hope, it came out of the mountain of despair that king spoke of and there is hope. >> reporter: a sentiment likely shared by so many on the mall today, including the man they all came to see. cecilia vega, abc news, washington. >>> and here again, george stephanopoulos, great to spend the day with you. so, did anything happen today that changed the political possibilities? >> i don't think so. one day, one speech cannot dot that. even though this is the day where all of america comes together, and that was one of the big themes of the president's speech. but one of the things i did think we saw today was a very changed president. and this is a very different time and a very different president from the one who took office four years ago. the speech four years ago, a dark speech. for a dark time. we were mired in crisis. the economy beginning to come back. and what you saw today is, the president gave a meditation on freedom and equality. it was a president who else felt free. >> an
. in this conversation we have the rear picture -- rare picture of king advising johnson how he's going to get re-elected in 1968 by getting the southern blacks registered. johnson is advising king -- johnson, who detests demonstrating in the streets, as most elected officials did -- is giving king clues about how he can make those demonstrations more effective. here we go. sound, lights, camera. someone let me know whether we have it or we don't. because i'm going to keep on talking. at any rate a close working relationship became even closer as civil rights movement and people in congress tried to put an end, finally, for all time, they hoped, black citizens being denied the right to vote. the first crisis came at the edmund pet tiss bridge -- pettis bridge in selma, alabama. king's lieutenants started off on a march from the town of selma, across the bridge with the stated intent of marching to montgomery. none of them had toothpaste or backpack -- a few of them had backpacks. it was a challenge. the idea was to produce a confrontation. and it did. i'm sure all of us have seen the pictures of sherr ri
at 12:01 or thereabouts, everyone in the process will be looking to their next election except for the president. so his clock moves faster than anyone els as he looks broader and farther, everyone else with a stake in the system will be looking narrower and more closely at their next election. so it'll be very tough. there's also the mathematical reality reality. four more years and the hardest job in the world means you have four more years of incredibly different problems. i promise you when we watch his successor drive up pennsylvania avenue in four years, we'll be talking about something we will not mention today. some unforeseen crisis. >> andrea mitchell what are you looking for over the next four years? >> you have a president who is actually energized by a feeling of possibilities. i think the way he took on guns that whole issue, that was not discussed at all during the campaign. he responded to the crisis. one of his opponents, ted cruz, the new tea-party supported senator said on "meet the press" yesterday, well he exploited it within minutes. t
that got him e re-elected and the way he paid tribute today. >> he came up late in the civil rights movement and always said that he regretted that. this is what he finally proclaimed with such passion today. you can look at his life and doctor king and the rise of civil rights in a very personal way. the day barack obama was born, four civil rights workers were arrested in louisiana. on august 4th, the civil rights act was passed by the senate. so there's so much history that was sort of, you could see it in his face today, i think in a more profound way than even is first inaugural. >> well, he comes from an unusual background. he comes from an imgrant mother who left the scene, white mother, middle american mother raised in hawaii and raised again in indonesia. >> so he had to construct an identity where he discovered, constructed, i think, because it was a deliberate process. he wrote about it in dreams for my father, his first book, it's been written about by others. and the identity that he constructed is an african american man. he went into the community in chicago, he -- yo
and the nation's debt. joining me now to debate those issues, chuck schumer of new york and newly elected republican senator ted cruz of texas. welcome back as senator cruz to "meet the press." back to both of you. i want to start on the gun debate. because as i say, even before the second term is officially underway thissy is bait is well underway. here are the highlights of what the president wants to accomplish. universal background checks. he'd like to pursue a ban on high capacity magazines. an assault weapons ban that lapsed in 2004. and he'd like stricter laws on gun trafficking. but senator schumer, just as i challenged wayne lapierre of the nra very hard when this came up, i challenge you as well with a question of, is this really going to make a difference? and rich lawry wrote something that caught my attention in "the national review." no one can write a law against mothers owning guns that one day might be turned against them by deranged sons who then commit horrific acts of murder-suicide. shooting rampages are hard to prevent because they are so often committed by young men
through they wonder why they bothered to get re-elected but i think president obama is in a position to put pressure on the congress because of the nature in which he won. he demonstrated there is now at the presidential level a pretty reliable consistent majority coalition that democrats have. and there's incentive for republicans to try to shake up this electoral alignment. and i think that gives him some leverage on several issues. guns to some extent. immigration even more so. >> and certainly we've seen a change in the president in the last few weeks. is this something that we can expect in the second term, do you think, overall, a more aggressive president obama? >> i think clearly. look what happened here. again, i go back to the election. democrats have often been con strained on some of these issues. guns is a perfect issue. we went over a decade where democrats didn't talk about the issue, largely by the fear of losing conservative white voters, blue collar voters, older voters. the president lost all those voters. he did badly with all of them and still won and he won 332
election, for example, i think the most racially divisive comment of the entire election was joe biden's comment where he said if the republicans win, they are, quote, going to put y'all back in chains. that made my heart weep to see a sitting vice president playing to racial fears and playing on those issues. i think that's unfortunate. i don't think it has any place in politics. >> chuck hagel, you were very tepid on "meet the press" a couple of weeks ago. >> i was. >> now you've met with him, you're more comfortable, you'll support him? >> i am. >> what changed? >> i said on your show that i had real concerns. i spent 90 minutes with him. i asked him very specific questions on the things that troubled me. his answers were forth right. and they were answers that alayed my concerns. should we keep every option on the table to prevent a nuclear iran? yes. i went further. i said, do you think we can tolerate a nuclear iran? he said no. and i said to him, well, then, if we had to use military as the only choice, would you? he said yes. second, i asked him hezbollah and hamas, should they
and to be part of the discussion. we've got federal, state and local policy makers, elected officials, educators, law enforcement officials and leaders from the private and public sector, all of whom have traveled here from washington, dc from sacramento and all over the bay area. so thank you for being here today. we are grateful for an opportunity to come together with you to create schools and communities where young people are healthy and safe and feel welcome and they are allowed to learn and they are allowed to thrive. this day is devoted to help all of us deepen our understanding of this issue of the problem through data, through research, through anecdotes, to put real solutions in place, to comply with new state and draw laws on bullying and to measure our progress. it's a promise we want to join you in keeping to our children and our youth in california. some of you know that we started this summit yesterday with a screening of the documentary film, bully, to 3,000 students in san francisco from san francisco's public schools. the superintendent of schools you're going to hear from
are not about him. >> what we're celebrating is not the election or swearing in of a president. we're doing celebrate aring each other. >> reporter: and he talked about the most significant of the weekend, he talks about his wife's haircut. >> i love her bangs. she looks good. she always looks good. >> reporter: and it won't end until late monday night when they attend three different ball. and more than a couple hours away before the ceremonies begin. president obama is only the 17 17th president to have a second inaugural. alternate the u.s. capitol, susan mcginnis, back to you. >> thank you so much. and of course cbs news will provide live coverage of today's inauguration festivities, it begins on cbs 5 and will run until 1 in the afternoon and no noon newscast today. cbs 5 will have reports from christin ayers in washington in the next half hour and during our 5 and 6:00 newscasts this evening. >>> it's 42 lovely degrees in washington right now. >> it's so cold there. >> chilly out there. chilly around the bay area. we have numbers around the 20s
super bowl and mardi gras and a costume. >> chris christie want to be re-elected. he's the republican. what do you make of this? >> i think it's an interesting dynamic. most people think of silicon valley with the democratic party but often times you see someone who has lived in a state who support the guy who is doing a good job. i think it's a good sign for dom governor christie. >> i don't think it's a good sign. i think it's a great sign. you have mark zuckerberg and trying to get re-elected. >> wolf f. i know he's married but he can friend me. i'll be very friendly to mark. friend me. >> guys, thanks very much. >> thank you. >>> manti te'o is not alone. an apparent hoax involving football players from the washington redskins. [ male announcer ] when we built the cadillac ats from the ground up to be the world's best sport sedan... ♪ ...people noticed. ♪ the all-new cadillac ats -- 2013 north american car of the year. ♪ for a limited time, take advantage of this exceptional offer on the all-new cadillac ats. exceptional offer did you just turn your ringer off so no one would
in election in two years. >> this and other difficulties appeared miles away as mr. obama recited the constitutional oath that cemented the start of his new term. >> i did it. >> sasha was referring to the mix jum four years ago where the chief justice and the president said some of the words of the oath out of sequence prompting a do-over here at the white house a couple of hours later. as sasha said nobody messed up this time and as said a couple of moments ago, that's probably not too bad. >>> robert gibbs was an adviser to the obama campaign and served as the white house's first press secretary. welcome. >> thank you. >> you have seen it you have read it, characterize it. >> i think it's hopeful, and it talks about the values and the visions and the ideals that bring us to this very moment as america. you'll hear the president talk a lot about what we have to do in this country together to make progress on the big challenges that we face. and, look, it's not just -- one party can't solve these issues. not even just those in government can tackle these
, over the top paranoia started with the election of a black president. >> how so? connect. >> let's remember that in 2008 obama had campaigned for his first election being afraid to mention the words gun and law in the same paragraph. he never said a single thing about gun control, gun safety laws. yet when he was elected, gun stores sold out of guns. gun stores sold out of ammunition because the gun lobby had persuaded them that this guy is coming for your guns. they're already paranoid, extremist -- >> let's get to that overlay. >> they don't like progressive, democratic administrations. a black president makes them crazy. >> this is what's changed congresswoman, in my focus. you have been totally focused for a generation since the tragedy in your family. this idea that we don't have a gun to protect ourselves, we don't have to go skeet shooting or shoot rabbits or deer in deer season, it's not the usual sort of healthy sounding at least reasons to have a gun. it's now i need my gun to protect me against the helicopters, the federal government, or the u.n. is coming to get me. a
. the challenge to us is to remember what we learned when we first entered this movement, that you never elect someone to make change happen for you. you elect somebody to make it a little easier for your movement to keep on making change after. and so, brothers and sisters, i implore you tonight, have a good time, party caressed well, then get right back on the battlefield tuesday morning because we took our democracy back and we ain't giving it up to nobody. thank you and god bless. fire it up. fire it up. fire it up! god bless you all. >> that was president of the naacp, benjamin jealous, speaking at the peace ball, voices of hope and resistance come here in washington, d.c. on sunday night. we will be back with more from the peace ball couldn't angela davis, sonia sanchez and others in a moment. ♪ [music break] >> sweet honey in the rock performing at the peace ball last night. this is "democracy now!," democracynow.org, the war and peace report. i'm amy goodman. we are broadcasting from washington, d.c., bringing you special coverage of today's inauguration as hundreds of thousands gath
in maryland, i've had the privilege of serving as a local elected official and governor -- once a local elected official, always a local elected official. what i learned from that is partnership is what it's all about. if you want to confront the most vexing problems, you have to bring people across an ideological spectrum, you have to include the business community, you have to include our nonprofit, our faith leaders. that's how you get things done, when you bring people together. and i look around this room and i see that you have already figured that out. i hope some of you had the opportunity to meet lee hirsch because i've done a lot of work with him in the context of our bullying. one of my favorite memories in my experience with lee is that we watched this film together with about a thousand people in sioux falls, south dakota, it was remarkable to watch the reactions of the kids in sioux falls, parents, educators, and we did that same q and a when we were done. i appreciate the wonderful words of your superintendent, that was exactly the dynamic in sioux falls and that's t
cannot-- they still cannot get over. they couldn't get over the first election. they're still shocked at the second election, to use a pun, shell shocked. >> sean: and mr. johnson, i have a wild thought perhaps the n.r.a. disagrees with the president's policies because she represent an assault on the second amendment to the constitution. and more, new york congressman charlie rangel said that the races in the south are to blame for the lack of gun laws in that region. >> new york in a the lot of areas and some of the states and some of the southern areas have cultures that we have to overcome. >> sean: so, with reaction to this the entire gun control showdown, author, attorney, david limbaugh and fox analyst, juan williams, juan, your reaction? >> well, i don't think that this is about the president's race, but i think that race has a lot to do with this conversation and that's why i think you have congressman johnson from georgia, saying, hey, look, if you look across the south, high membership in the n.r.a., high amount of gun ownership, principally among whites and in fact, mostly
think to some may be small degree, has been realized in the election and inauguration the first black president of this country. >> well, you know, with the first election, i along with so many other people just broke down and cried and cried and cried. out of thankfulness, out of remembering what we had been through. and thinking about medgar and all those other people who gave their lives and gave so much that we don't even recognize any more. and hopefully, will begin to do that in the very, very near future. >> myrlie evers-williams, we're looking forward to your three minutes, we can't wait. >> so am i. >> so great to see you. >>> so a man who marched alongside martin luther king jr. during the civil rights era, congressman john lewis, he will be here, we will speak to him in just a moment. >> we're going to talk about what this inauguration means for him and also the challenges still ahead in the president's second term. [ tylenol bottle ] nyquil what are you doing? [ nyquil bottle ] just reading your label. wait...you relieve nasal congestion? sure don't you? [ nyquil bottle ]
is supposed to be for the people. it is not. we really don't elect the president no more. the electoral votes do. we don't have any say. we are the ones that just keep paying. we are paying more and more and more taxes all the time. so there's always some reason they've got to have more money. why don't they take some money out of their pockets for one year? let them learn to live like we do. they all live way above their means. does not take a half million dollars or zero million dollars a year to live.- -- it does not take a half million dollars or $1 million a year to live. host: we have members of congress coming in this morning and we will throw out your proposal to them to see what they think. on twitter -- here's a headline in the washington post. let's hear or twice house secretary jay carney hata said. [video clip] >> the bill still has to overcome concerns expressed by members of the house and senate before it can pass both chambers and reached the president's desk. if it does and it reaches his desk, he will not stand in the way of the bill becoming law. broadly speaking, i will po
, and they're not totally in love with his first term. he just beat his rival in the election. >> people have lower expectations, so i think we're going to -- he may try and raise that a little bit. this will be a lot of poetry, and the state of the union address is going to be the prose where he really lays out the agenda. >> let's bring in the auth aror the book "barack obama the story" and margaret hoover, republican consultant and cnn contributor. david, what are you expecting to hear? >> i think there's a paradox here, which is that four years ago there were huge crowds and so much ebullience of the moment. he gave such a wintry speech. today there's smaller crowds, i think he's giving a more optimistic speech. i think he feels he's in a much better place today than he was four years ago? >> cornell? >> i think we'll hear some of the things picked up from the campaign. he's got to talk about the economy, talk about the number one issue to americans, and that's jobs and expanding and growing the middle class. we're looking at a middle class that continues to shrink, and it's something tha
the election against the incumbent, and at issue was the iran contra crisis, where americans were held for over 400 days after a group of islamic militants and students took over the embassy. as he was giving his inauguration address, the militants were being released. this is about 25 minutes. [applause] >> governor, are you prepared to take the constitutional oath? >> i am. >> raise your right hand and repeat after me. i, ronald reagan, do solemnly swear, that i will faithfully execute the office of president of the united states and will come to the best of my ability preserve, protect, and defend the constitution of the united states. so help you god. >> so help me, god. [applause] ♪ ["hail to the chief" plays] >> >> the president of the united states. [applause] >> thank you. thank you. senator hatfield, mr. justice, mr. president, vice president bush, vice president mondale, senator baker, speaker o'neill, reverend moomaw, and my fellow citizens, to a few of us here today this is a solemn and most momentous occasion, and yet in the history of our nation it is a commonplace occurrence. t
to go against me for re-election. you are going to go against me on the vietnam war. >> guest: yes. king now i understand what courage it took to take the stand that he did and i understand more about why he hesitated. faretta was very much involved in the antiwar movement from an early stage but again she was not the public figure so he could send her essentially to speak for him. >> host: again he proved dr. king right. >> guest: i think so. this was one of the ways -- i think he's a visionary. i think he understood the connection between the anti-colonial movements going on around the world and understood how the cold war had prevented us from seeing -- we were on the wrong side, that because the communist movement had identified itself with anti-colonialism many of these nationalists wanted to have the assistance of the soviet union so we saw it in cold war terms. >> host: my enemy's enemy is my friend. you left the country during the vietnam era. why? >> guest: well, for me looking back it wasn't that difficult a choice because i knew i wasn't going to go into the military. >> host:
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 93 (some duplicates have been removed)